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The regional security dilemma stemming from Iran’s nuclear program has led many to speculate about whether or not Turkey will opt to pursue a nuclear weapons capability. Since 2006, Turkey has been named as one of the states likely to seek out nuclear weapons if Iran were to decide to develop its own nuclear arsenal. These assumptions, however, do not account for Ankara’s long held and consistent policies on nonproliferation and nuclear weapons. This paper explores Turkey’s approach to nuclear issues and identifies the numerous constraints a Turkish leader would face when making the decision to pursue for a nuclear weapon.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Aaron Stein
Aaron Stein

Aaron Stein is the Director of Research at the Foreign Policy Research Institute.

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