Independent and cutting-edge analysis on global affairs

Despite its NATO membership and relationship with the United States, Turkey has embarked on strategic policy of deepening its ties with the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. This article analyzes the possible outcomes for Turkish policy in Central Asia though a comparative analysis with India’s similar policy in the region. New Delhi has sought to maintain its strategic autonomy from both Moscow and Washington. India’s policy has caused Russia, in addition to China, to marginalize India in the region. Without a strategic partnership with any of the major powers, New Delhi finds itself sidelined in several Central Asian republics in the run-up to NATO’s 2014 Afghanistan withdrawal.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Michaël Tanchum
Michaël Tanchum

Dr. Michaël Tanchum teaches international relations of the Middle East and North Africa at the University of Navarra, Spain and is a Senior Fellow at the Austrian Institute for European and Security Studies (AIES). He also holds fellow positions at the Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace, the Hebrew University, Israel, and at the Centre for Strategic Policy Implementation at Başkent University in Ankara, Turkey (Başkent-SAM). Follow Michaël Tanchum: @michaeltanchum 

 

The Premium Corporate Sponsor of TPQ
Yapı Kredi
Foreword Israel, formally known as "The State of Israel," was established on 14 May 1948, and has since played a pivotal role in international affairs, particularly in the politics of the Middle East and North Africa. Israel's relations with its Arab neighbors have been tense for decades, and a lasting peace has never appeared more likely. Yet, we already live in a time of perpetual change,...
STAY CONNECTED
SIGN UP FOR NEWSLETTER
PARTNERS